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The Secret To Improving Mental Health With Physical Activity 

When I first entered the field of performance coaching, terms like building resilience, develop focused attention, manage sustainable energy levels and strengthen our emotional intelligence were sought after areas of development not only in elite athletic training; but also, executive development. 

As the demands of life rise for our clients, the best way we can support them is by designing health and fitness routines that combine all the elements of health and performance.  Our clients are seeking our expertise on how to “feel” better physically, mentally and emotionally. And the one tool that links the mind, body and brain is BREATH.

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SIMPLE TIPS TO STAVE OFF ARTHRITIS SYMPTOMS!

In 2020, COVID-19 changed the world. Businesses closed, social gatherings ceased, isolation grew, and the fear of catching the Corona Virus was on the rise. In fact, for those with compromised immune systems due to chronic autoimmune diseases, the increased stresses of navigating a world full of dangerous contagions has led to an increase in the consumption of medications to battle painful symptoms and lingering flare-ups. Isolation and loneliness have led to an increase in feelings of depression, anxiety, and overall mood, which directly impacts the ability to deal with painful symptoms.

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Functional Movement Patterns in Exercise For MS

You’ve heard the terms “functional exercise”, “functional movement” or “functional movement patterns”.   But what do these terms, thrown out there by trainers a lot, actually mean? The term “functional movement patterns” is confusing because it is really not a specific term. Trainers, especially those putting MSers on exercise programs, will usually take you through a program of upper and lower body exercises incorporating compound movements that ask your body to do several things at once. They tell you this is a functional exercise routine and that it’s the best way to help you with your MS limitations. Every exercise is NOT considered a functional one. So what’s the difference?

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Regaining Physical Fitness in a Post-Pandemic World

Yes, I know we’re still dealing with a life-changing pandemic around the world and especially in most areas of the United States, but it is still worth thinking ahead to what comes next. Despite a current focus on non-gym fitness trends (see an article in Time [1]), it is more than likely that many of us have experienced a change (most often a decrease) in our daily physical activities and, subsequently, in our aerobic and muscular fitness levels. 

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Stay Active to Reduce the Risk of Falling: 5 Exercises to Keep You Fit

Did you know that over 33 percent of people older than 65, fall each year? As people age, the risk of falling increases and so does the fear of having a fall-related accident. Part of that fear prevents many from engaging in physical activities.  Rather than avoiding an active lifestyle, there are strategic, smart ways to stay active while decreasing your chances of falling. In this article, we’ll discuss a few fall prevention exercises that can strengthen your body, while improving your coordination and balance.

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Launching Soon! Osteoporosis Fitness Specialist Course

I am excited to finally bring you the Osteoporosis Fitness Specialist program. It started about 3 years ago as a presentation on the MedFit Tour in Phoenix. It was then developed into a webinar, then short continuing education product, and now a full 10-hour course! It has been nicknamed Project B.O.N.E. for Beating Osteoporosis with Nutrition and Exercise.

It is a unique course in the fitness world because it is a total turn-key format. It starts in the first module with education on bone anatomy and physiology. It then delves into what osteoporosis and osteopenia are and how our bone mass naturally changes across time. It then goes into some of the mechanisms of how bone adapts to the stresses we put on it as well as the interrelationships between joints, bones and movements and how they can improve or decrease with movement or lack of it.

The second module goes into the role nutrients play on bone health. It is interesting that you can approach this from four different perspectives. First, you can attempt to integrate certain foods into your diet that help you obtain calcium, vitamin D, and other bone-building nutrients. Second, you can try to avoid foods that actually decrease calcium absorption and even the stores in your bone. These are termed calcium-robbing foods.

I have developed 13 short video segments that are entitled “EAT this, NOT that” to help guide people with substituting good food for a “bad food”, or one that potentially depletes calcium. Taking in the right nutrients is key because the exercises that strengthen bones are not able to do their “job” if the nutrients that can build bone are not available. Trying to change the way someone eats is one of the more difficult things in life. By making gradual changes and by substituting one food for another, the transitions become easier, and before you know it you are eating well!

The third module is about how exercise can change your bone health and why it works.  One common misconception is that weightlifting is going to stress your bones more than body weight movements that use ground forces. This is simply not true. The target spots and how to work them are combined into the SHoW ME pneumonic — which informs which body parts to focus on (Spine, Hips, and Wrists) and what exercise modalities to use, with Multiplanar activity and Eccentric contractions being the best for bone-building if the client can handle it. Another pneumonic is the SAFE exercises, which represents Strength, Agility, Flexibility and Equilibrium or balance.

The fourth module is on assessments. This is one of the keys to the innovation of this program. Not only does the assessment encompass personal traits, habits, demographic and activities of daily living, but it has a comprehensive physical assessment which is named the ABCEDEFF battery. The agility, balance (both static and dynamic), coordination, dexterity or deftness, endurance, force or strength in both upper and lower regions, and flexibility in both upper and lower regions are part of this assessment program. The tests are simple to perform and the individual will fall into one of four categories, with some having male and female standards separately. The proper way to perform the assessment tests are demonstrated in videos.

The fifth module is putting it all together meaning you’re using: a) the results of your assessment and b) the client’s intake information, which includes their c) needs, limitations and preferences to combine it into a comprehensive, highly-personalized and effective. Clientas will likely not be at the same level for all the variables tested, so you may have a client who is strong but inflexible or a client that is flexible but weak. You address the weak spots and monitor progress easily.

Why is it so effective? Because the assessment will categorize the client one of four levels. Each exercise has four levels for proper progression or regression. The client is getting the right exercise for them depending on their skills, bone density and any limitations. Exercises are similar in each of the three workout venues — a gym, a park, and at home — but vary with the equipment available and surroundings. Each of these venues has pros and cons and in the current age of COVID, it is important to have alternatives to turn to.

The final module addresses some business aspects. Marketing and promoting your skills and knowledge are what keeps you in business. There must be a balance between the training skills and knowledge as well as how to manage the logistics and getting the word out.

I believe this program will set a new standard in training programs and how to carefully train a client with the knowledge gained from an assessment and thorough intake questionnaire. The disease of osteoporosis is only going to get bigger. With 54 million Americans already with low bone density, the numbers are already huge!

Join the waitlist to be notified when the course is live on MedFit Classroom. You’ll get an exclusive 50% discount when it launches!


Dr. Mark P. Kelly has been involved with the health and fitness field for more than 30 years. He has been a research scientist for universities and many infomercial projects. He has spoken nationally and internationally on a wide variety of topics and currently speaks on the use of exercise for clinical purposes and exercise’s impact on the brain. Mark is a teacher in colleges and universities in Orange County, CA., where Principle-Centered Health- Corporate Wellness & Safety operates.

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The Naturopathic Chef: Cowboy Cavier

This recipe adds an amazing fresh note to grilled meats and is an easy snack on the go. Pack a ziploc with a small container of “caviar.” Put the chips and napkin in, too. You’ve got yourself a little cowboy survival kit. I wipe the crumbs out of the bag and reuse. Clean eating and a clean planet! 

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7 Simple Habits You Didn’t Know Could Affect Your Bones

Do you know that the things you do every day can affect your bones? Sadly, ‘harmless’ things that are a part of our routine can actually hurt our bones in the long run. For example, we carry a lot of weight, we lead a sedentary life, we eat all the wrong things; and with the passage of time, we develop joint aches and bone ailments.

By eliminating these simple habits from our lifestyles, we can avoid getting osteoarthritis and protect our health.  Continue reading to find out more.

1.     Sedentary Lifestyle

We wake up, go to work, and sit in front of a computer screen all day. People who spend a lot of time sitting have at a higher risk of suffering from osteoporosis. Practicing a sedentary lifestyle is common for people who work in an office. There is not much time to move around.

Walking, dancing and running can be very helpful in strengthening your bones. So give your bones the exercise they need.

2.     Lack of Sleep

Rest is essential for everyone. The thing you should know about your body is that it goes through a constant cycle of detoxifying and cleansing. This process starts with the lymphatic system and continues to your liver. They slowly re-balance and restore the essential functions of your body. And for this process to occur, your body needs to be submerged in deep rest.

Research shows that lack of sleep damages the health of your bones as well. It also reduces the bone marrow and makes materialization difficult, which can lead to osteoporosis in the future.

3.     Be Careful with High Heels and Bags

Women have a lot of habits that damage their bones over time. We all drool over our high heels and spend a considerable portion of our paycheck buying the perfect pair. What we don’t know that wearing high heels frequently have a terrible impact on our posture. And thereby, affect the bones in our shins, feet, and back. After a long day of wearing heels, intense pain and fatigue sets in. And in the years that come by, you could suffer from serious problems. So instead of choosing high heels, go for the medium ones.

Another thing that is affecting your posture is those heavy bags. Without even realizing it, some women carry 10 kilos worth of stuff in their tote and shoulder bags. Carrying so much weight, unfortunately, puts a great deal of stress on your shoulders and spine. Not to forget, it causes pain and discomfort.

4.     Smoking

We have all heard the warning that smoking is bad for health. What most people don’t know is that it is even worse for your bones. Studies prove that people who use tobacco frequently have lower levels of bone density. Smokers are at a higher risk for fractures than non-smokers. Smoking produces free radicals which kill the cells that build bones (i.e., osteoblasts). If you have already had a fractured bone, smoking damages your blood vessels, which result in the slow healing process.

So throw away that pack of cigarettes, you don’t need them, and neither do your bones.

5.     High Salt Consumption

There is definitely a relationship between lower bone density and high salt intake.

We all know salt is bad for our skeletal system as it leeches calcium from our bones. The junk food that we like to munch on time and again is also causing harm to our joints and ligaments. Table salt consists of chloride and sodium. If we consume too much of it, it promotes metabolic acidosis. And that contributes towards the loss of bone density in the long run.

6.     Constant Coffee and Soda Consumption

Your day isn’t complete without a cup of coffee. Caffeine is necessary to wake up and give our day the much-needed boost. Coffee contains Methylated xanthine, which increases the amount of calcium release through urine. And over time, the minerals from your bones are affected, resulting in brittle bones.

One or two cups of coffee a day is fine. But, if you exceed that number, your bones will suffer the consequences.

Another drink that affects the health of your bones is soda, especially cola drinks. Sodas have a high amount of phosphoric acids in them, which reduce the consumption of calcium. So it’s better to avoid carbonated beverages so they can’t cause problems later.

7.     Sugary or Processed Foods

Packaged and highly-processed foods have low nutrients and high sodium and sugar level. Processed food contains food additives and synthetic chemicals that are very bad for your health. Packaged foods often include hydrogenated oils that are very damaging to your bones. In addition to that, your bones will pay a hefty price if you indulge yourself in a lot of sugary snacks. Not only sugar is inflammatory; it also leads to the blood-sugar imbalances that damage your bones.

Remember, if you cut back on these 7 habits, your bones will be stronger, and you will avoid a lot of bone-related problems in your later life. Not to forget, watch your calcium and vitamin D intake so your bones could be healthy!


Zyana Morris is a passionate blogger who loves to write on trending health, fitness and lifestyle topics. She is a featured author at HealthableUplifting FamiliesInscriber MagHello Mamas and few others. Her favorite quote “It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop”. You can follow her through Facebook and Twitter.